Utterslev Bog

The city’s biggest wild park. A favourite spot for twitchers and runners. Time, space, air, sky, water, peace and quiet, sunbathing and playgrounds for children… all just a few miles from City Hall. Utterslev Bog has plenty of friends, but there’s room for many more.

In fact, this green area is so large that it’s easy to get lost in it. Fortunately, you’ll be quite safe – you’ll soon find a path again. But in an otherwise orderly city, it’s fascinating to encounter an area that has all the hallmarks of natural disorder.

The water, reed beds and undergrowth attract a multitude of birds. There is no other place in Copenhagen where so many different species breed.

It was once home to a giant colony of black-headed gulls, but sadly they have moved on. Today, the usually shy greylag goose is the most noticeable bird, by virtue of its size and numbers – and here they are more tame than usual. The roads around Utterlsev Bog are probably the only ones in the world with signs warning of geese crossing.

On a May morning, the nightingale sings at full voice while the bittern sighs among the reeds, sounding for all the world like somebody blowing into a bottle.

Bird watchers can spot several rare species here for most of the year, and there is an observation tower in the middle of this paradise. If you don’t care for birdlife, there is much more to entice you, like the beautiful bog – in reality, four lakes.

The downside is that the water here is of poor quality. Sewage has damaged the aquatic environment, but efforts are being made on various fronts and the water quality is slowly improving.

Photo: Stig Nørhald

Share Button
  • Bird watching
  • Running
  • Cycling
  • Peace and quiet
  • Walking
  • Play
  • Ball games
  • Picnics and barbecues
  • Nature workshop and nature tours
  • Fishing
  • Dog exercise area, where dogs are allowed off the leash to run free
  • Copenhagen once got its water from Utterslev Bog. It was piped into the city where people collected drinking water from fountains.
  • Many species of bird, including a number of terns and gulls, greylag geese, rare small birds.
  • Foxes and squirrels are seen frequently. The lakes are home to one of Denmark’s largest populations of pike.
  • Many butterfly and dragonfly species. Willow is the most common tree. Many herbs and berry bushes.
  • No, but many of the paths are suitable for wheelchairs.
  • ‘Mosehuset’ is open during the summer.
  • Space for picnics and barbecues.
1 km

Get directions here